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Posts Tagged ‘hope’

They Never Saw a Child : Ruby Bridges Interview

In Inspiration, News on November 16, 2013 at 12:34 pm

Every time I watch videos taken during the Civil Rights Era I cringe at the images, I feel sadness that any human being is treated so poorly by communities and I feel shame. I also feel hope, because while there is still much more work to be done there has been progress. Yes, there are still injustices and prejudices but there is also a deepening of acceptance in society not just for people who’s skin is a different color than our own but for those who have a different sexual preference or a different religion. For that reason I have hope. I know I have taught my children tolerance and compassion and that is where change starts in our homes. You have to see the child to understand where change needs to begin.

 

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Our kids are not just their test scores.

In Inspiration, Random on November 5, 2013 at 3:21 pm

 

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The following letter is to some students from their principle. It was sent home with their standardized tests scores. This, to me, is someone who really understands the education of our children. I found the letter on the blog of Mrs. Rycus, a third grade teacher.

The body of the letter:

“We are concerned that these tests do not always assess all of what it is that make each of you special and unique. The people who create these tests and score them do not know each of you– the way your teachers do, the way I hope to, and certainly not the way your families do. They do not know that many of you speak two languages. They do not know that you can play a musical instrument or that you can dance or paint a picture. They do not know that your friends count on you to be there for them or that your laughter can brighten the dreariest day. They do not know that you write poetry or songs, play or participate in sports, wonder about the future, or that sometimes you take care of your little brother or sister after school. They do not know that you have traveled to a really neat place or that you know how to tell a great story or that you really love spending time with special family members and friends. They do not know that you can be trustworthy, kind or thoughtful, and that you try, every day, to be your very best… the scores you get will tell you something, but they will not tell you everything. There are many ways of being smart.”

 

The picture belongs to Sanshoot on Flickr

Do You Really Understand How Many Kids Are Hungry?

In Inspiration, Random on November 1, 2013 at 7:05 am

 

Hunger should not be an issue in a country as prosperous as the United States. Now that the food stamp program has been cut but prices still rise it will be even more difficult. Think about how much food is thrown away each day. Can you look a child in the face and tell them they don’t deserve to eat? There are so many children in our country who rely on school lunches and the SNAP program. Do something, anything, to help feed them.

Places you can donate:

Local food banks

Feeding America.org

Ample Harvest.org

 

31 Posts for Breast Cancer Awareness Month…For Mom Day 31

In Breast Cancer, Inspiration, Writing on October 31, 2013 at 8:57 am

Mom BW car

Many of you have read my posts this month for Breast Cancer Awareness month and I want to thank you for that. I also want to thank those of you who linked to the posts or shared them with your friends and family. There is no real way that I can offer a tribute to my Mom other than being the best person that I can be and keeping her memory alive. But this month’s posts made me feel that I was honoring her in a meaningful way. I miss my mom. Please perform your monthly breast exams, get your annual mammogram and take care of the girls. Your life is important to more people than you realize.

October 2013 Breast Cancer Awareness Posts….For My Mom

One Year With Breast Cancer… For Mom Day 1

Your Doctor is Not the Only Healer….For Mom Day 2

Yes, I am so shallow I want a hot guy to remind me to exam my breasts. For My Mom Day 3

My Mom Was So Beautiful…For Mom Day 4

If You Don’t Think Breast Cancer Awareness Works, Watch This…For Mom Day 5

Behind the Scenes with Breast Cancer….For Mom Day 6

Breast Cancer and Men…For Mom Day 7

Pink Ribbon Tattoos ….For Mom Day 8

Cate Edwards: My Mom’s Bravery….For My Mom Day 9

Not All Men Are Supportive…For Mom Day 10

Music to Soothe the Soul…For Mom Day 11

Breast Cancer: Just Beat It…For Mom Day 12

Racing For Boobies….For Mom Day 13

11 Inspirational Breast Cancer Quotes…For Mom Day 14

I Think You Are Wonderful. And I’m Not the Only One…For Mom Day 15

Art and the Fight Against Breast Cancer…For Mom Day 16

Worldwide Faces of Breast Cancer….For Mom Day 17

A Mom, Breast Cancer and Cupcakes…For My Mom Day 18

Why Is It That Sometimes When We Face Death That Is When We Start To Live?…For Mom Day 19

The Battle We Didn’t Choose: Photograph of his Wife’s Journey…For mom Day 20

Are You There, Twitter? Judy Blume Shares Breast Cancer Diagnosis…For Mom Day 21

This Is My Good Side…Scar and All: Body image After Breast Cancer….For Mom Day 22

Men Get Breast Cancer Too, Just Ask Harvey Singer…For Mom Day 23

You don’t have to fear breast cancer….For Mom Day 24

Mamming: Will This Become an Olympic Sport?…For Mom Day 25

A Meal Can Make a Difference: Meal Train…For Mom Day 26

Moving Beyond Breast Cancer….For Mom Day 27 

Just the Facts…For Mom Day 28

When Pink Is Just a Color Again…For Mom Day 29

HOPE – Breast Cancer Song – Written & Performed by 12yr old Capri Roberto Anderson….For Mom Day 30

In Memory of My Mom, Ann Brooks.

HOPE – Breast Cancer Song – Written & Performed by 12yr old Capri Roberto Anderson….For Mom Day 30

In Breast Cancer on October 30, 2013 at 8:14 am

For My Mom, Ann Brooks

Mom BW car

When Pink Is Just a Color Again…For Mom Day 29

In Breast Cancer on October 29, 2013 at 7:53 am

 

I am hoping one day pink is just a color again. Take back pink, support breast cancer research.

 

In Memory of My Mom, Ann Brooks

Mom Bo's wedding

Just the Facts…For Mom Day 28

In Breast Cancer on October 28, 2013 at 7:40 am

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In Memory of My Mom. Ann Brooks

Mom laughing

A Beautiful Love Story: NPR, StoryCorps, Danny and Annie

In Inspiration, Random on October 27, 2013 at 8:51 am

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‘Never Say Goodbye’: A Love And Life Kept Vivid

by NPR STAFF

October 25, 2013 3:28 AM

Annie Perasa on a recent visit to StoryCorps.

StoryCorps

When we first met Danny and Annie Perasa in 2004, we heard about how their first date unfolded into an on-the-spot marriage proposal. We got a sense of Danny’s big personality and his deep love for his wife. And we heard about his daily love notes to her.

To my princess, the weather out today is extremely rainy, I’ll call you at 11:20 in the morningAnd I love you, I love you, I love you.

“If I don’t have a note on the kitchen table, I think there’s something wrong,” Annie told StoryCorps then. “You write a love letter to me every morning.”

“When a guy is happily married, no matter what happens at work, no matter what happens in the rest of the day,” Danny said, “there’s a shelter when you get home, there’s a knowledge, knowing that you can hug somebody without them throwing you down the stairs and saying, ‘Get your hands off me.’ Being married is like having a color television set; you never want to go back to black and white.”

Two years later, we learned that Danny, a horse-betting clerk, stopped by the StoryCorps booth many times to talk about his love for Annie, a nurse. Danny had become something of a public face of StoryCorps, the 2004 interview touching so many. StoryCorps dedicated its recording booth in Grand Central Terminal to the couple.

We also learned that Danny had been diagnosed with a fast-spreading cancer.

Not long after his diagnosis, the Perasas recorded another StoryCorps interview, this time at their Brooklyn, N.Y., home. Danny again spoke of his love for Annie.

“I always said the only thing I have to give you was a poor gift, and it’s myself, and I always gave it, and if there’s a way to come back and give it, I’ll do that too,” Danny said.

And there was another love letter from Danny to Annie.

The Perasas' StoryCorps interview in 2006, not long after Danny was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

The Perasas’ StoryCorps interview in 2006, not long after Danny was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

StoryCorps

My dearest wife, this is a very special day. It is a day on which we share our love which still grows after all these years. Now that love is being used by us to sustain us through these hard times. All my love, all my days and more. Happy Valentine’s Day.

“I could write on and on about her. She lights up the room in the morning when she tells me to put both hands on her shoulders so that she can support me. She lights up my life when she says to me at night, ‘Wouldn’t you like a little ice cream? Or ‘Would you please drink more water?’ ” Danny said. “I mean, those aren’t very romantic things to say, but they stir my heart. In my mind and my heart there has never been, there is not now and never will be another Annie.”

Not long after the interview, Danny Perasa passed away in his sleep after his fight with pancreatic cancer.

Today, Annie, 71, still lives in the apartment where that 2006 interview was recorded.

“I know that people have written to StoryCorps asking if I was still alive,” Annie says. “No, I’m still alive, and I live with the philosophy that Danny and I always had. It was: Never say goodbye.”

Danny and Annie Perasa on their wedding day on April 22, 1978.

Danny and Annie Perasa on their wedding day on April 22, 1978.

Courtesy of Annie Perasa

This year they would have celebrated their 35th wedding anniversary. “And I miss my letters from Danny; I do,” Annie says. “But after Danny died, I had received 1,300 letters of condolences. I mean, I got letters as far away as Beijing, China, or Paris, France:

My English is not too well please excuse me, I wish to send my condolences.

“So I would read one a day because Danny wrote me a love letter every day,” Annie says.

“You know, like people say, ‘You must miss Danny terribly.’ No, it was an honor to be married to him, so it’s not terrible that I had the time to be with him,” Annie says. “You know, life is too short. You come, and you’re gone. But Danny didn’t go. He’s not gone because of StoryCorps.”

Produced for Morning Edition by Michael Garofalo with Sarah Kramer.

If you would like to hear the NPR broadcast please go to : http://www.npr.org/2013/10/25/240291885/never-say-goodbye-a-love-and-life-kept-vivid?utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=20131027&utm_source=mostemailed

A Meal Can Make a Difference: Meal Train…For Mom Day 26

In Breast Cancer on October 26, 2013 at 7:40 am

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‘Meal Train’ For Breast Cancer: Shared Online Calendar Organizes Meals For Patients And Their Families

By  | Oct 18, 2013 05:39 PM EDT

meal Trains sponsored by Magnolia

(meal Trains/mealtrain.com/mmt)  Breast cancer patients and their families can receive free nutritious meals through Magnolia-sponsored meal Trains shared online calendar.

Nutrition is important for everyone, especially those who are currently undergoing treatment for breast cancer. A healthy diet that consists of fruit, vegetables, and regular protein will helpto provide the amount of nutrients breast cancer patients need to keep up their strength and energy during treatment. But it’s not always easy for those patients to shop and cook for themselves. Meal Trains for breast cancer patients aims to facilitate mealtime for families by providing a free, online shared calendar that simplifies the process of giving and receiving meals to households going through a difficult time throughout the U.S.

“I felt relieved with the first meals that I received,” Michelle Davis, a breast cancer patient and meal Trains user from Hamilton, Ohio told Medical Daily.

Davis learned about meal Trains through the help of one of her dance students. The Ohio resident is the director of a community ballet company who was asked by a parent if she would be interested in setting up a meal Train for her family while she underwent chemotherapy. She knew undergoing treatment would take a significant toll on her and likely cause her to have to give up some of her normal “mom” duties to those who were willing and wanting to support her through this time.

“Knowing that the meal preparation and delivery was all organized took a burden off of my husband and I during a time already heavily burdened,” said Davis.

Meal Trains has historically provided support for meal services of all kinds. According to their website, “mealTrain.com is a free solution that simplifies the organization of giving and receiving meals. By allowing the giving party to take into account the recipient’s preferred meal times, food preferences, and available days, the site helps ensure that the recipient gets the meals they enjoy on the days that are most helpful.” Eisai Inc., along with collaborators CancerCare and Cancer Support Community launched a special Magnolia-sponsored meal Trains during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month as a way to provide an opportunity to focus on the day-to-day issues facing families coping with a breast cancer diagnosis. Magnolia is Eisai’s Women’s Oncology Program.

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“We aim to provide an infrastructure for communities to deliver this much needed support to households coping with the stress of a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment,” said Christine Verini, Vice President, Corporate Communications and Advocacy, Eisai Inc. toMedical Daily.

The program allows family and friends to schedule and organize the delivery of home-cooked meals to those affected by breast cancer, providing needed support without being asked.

Magnolia meal Train infographic #1Magnolia meal Train infographic.

Kathy Nugent, director of social services at CancerCare told Medical Daily, “People living with breast cancer may find it difficulty or don’t want to ask for help when undergoing cancer treatments. Also, many want help but don’t know how to access it.”

The shared online calendar can be accessed by a breast cancer patient who is undergoing treatment, their caregivers, friends, or family by visiting the website. The online user will have to enter the code “Magnolia C” to view the breast cancer-specific page. This is followed by a simple process that includes identifying dates when support will be needed, as well as food likes, dislikes and allergies. An e-mail is then sent to friends and neighbors inviting them to sign-up to prepare and deliver a meal.

Magnolia meal Train infographic #2Magnolia meal Train infographic #2.

Davis has structured her online shared calendar based on her specific needs. She only gets meals every other week during the weeks she receives treatment. “It’s all automated, I don’t have to constantly ask people for help or feel pressure to know how to respond when people ask me what I need,” Davis said. “It’s all set up and the meals are delivered when I need them by the people in my life who want to lend a hand.”

Meal Trains has also allowed Davis to eat well together with her family without the stress of figuring out who was going to fix food on the weeks she wasn’t feeling her best. The program even allowed her to spend more time with her kids and husband. Davis’s 14-year-old daughter has well-received the program and is even going to miss it. “She’s happy that my treatments are going to end, but that she’s really going to miss thegreat food that we’ve had delivered,” Davis told Medical Daily.

She admits it may be difficult to let go of that sense of control over your family but the support the program provides lets patients know how much they are cared for. “Take care of yourself during treatments,” Davis said, “And let others take care of you because you should do just that!”

To learn how you or someone you know can start a Magnolia sponsored meal Train, visitwww.mealTrain.com/mmt and enter the code “MagnoliaC.”

 

In Memory of My Mom, Ann Brooks

Mom Bo's wedding

Remember How We Forgot

In Uncategorized on October 25, 2013 at 5:22 pm

Shane Koyczan is amazing and the violinist Hannah Epperson is equally so. I have listened to several pieces by Shame and he always impresses me. Wonderful.
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